Greensburg Daily News, Greensburg, IN

News

July 28, 2010

New Quick Cook Meth An Even More Dangerous Recipe

Greensburg — When the federal government passed the Combat Methamphetamine Epidemic Act in 2005, over-the-counter psuedoephedrine sales were restricted and the number of meth labs in the United States dropped sharply.

The act forced "meth cooks" and dealers to seek alternative methods of selling and manufacturing the highly addictive substance. As the Indiana State Police, the Greensburg Police Department and the Decatur County Sheriff's Department work to shut down meth distributorships in the county and surrounding communities, inventive and creative meth dealers have found another way to make the drug, threatening the progress that communities like Decatur County and law enforcement have made in the fight against it.

The new system of making meth is called the "one-pot method," sometimes referred to as the "shake and bake method."

According to Master Tpr. Chip Ayers of the ISP's Meth Suppression Section, the one-pot method takes less time, is just as strong and addictive as "normal" meth and is less traceable. Using the new strategy, meth makers mix smaller amounts of over-the-counter psuedoephedrine and other readily available chemicals in a plastic two-liter soda bottle.

The one-pot method allows meth makers to bypass the traditional meth lab and create the drug without a flame or a large-scale operation. It also reprieves Indiana's meth dealers from engaging in the risky behavior of anhydrous ammonia theft, a chief ingredient in the traditional meth recipe. Instead of pilfering the anhydrous ammonia, meth cooks can now mix together fertilizers and the psuedoephedrine in the two-liter bottle, or one pot. Farmers, sheriff's deputies and members of the community have become more alert around their anhydrous supplies, increasing the risk for those attempting to steal it. Innovative meth dealers have also found ways to extract ammonium nitrate, an ingredient necessary in the one-pot method, from "cold packs."

This new technique for making meth has been popularized in parts of Indiana, according to Tpr. Ayers. It has gained significant momentum in Jennings County and remains prevalent in areas north like South Bend and in the south-central part of the state.

"It's all they see up there," Ayers explained.

The one-pot method has not yet become the mode of choice in Decatur County for the meth trade, but its prevalence in surrounding communities could be cause for concern.

"In Decatur County, it's not very popular, yet," Ayers said. "Each and every week, we start to see more and more of it.Ó"

Though the traditional method and the one-pot system contain inherent risks due to the volatility of the chemicals involved, Ayers explained that the ISP is finding that the one-pot technique is actually more dangerous.

"The ingredients are just not compatible," he said.

The lithium batteries involved in both processes react violently in water, and in the one-pot method, they are directly compounded. This creates a potentially more volatile situation, in which the pot (the soda bottle) is held closely to the person and could erupt in a ball of fiery gas.

"Each and every way has its inherent dangers," Ayers said.

Once the meth is extracted from the pot, the cook will often dispose of the waste materials, usually by dumping them along the roadside, essentially putting the contents of the waste out in the open where they could potentially be found by children and pets. Ayers explained that when the equipment is thrown out, it is usually wrapped in an old bag or trash bag before being tossed outside. Recently, the Indiana State Police located two such items along the roadside in Sand Creek Township. Bridges and culverts are also hot spots for meth trash.

The discarded bottles are dangerous, due to the fact that the quick method of meth making does not allow the chemicals to be totally absorbed or utilized. To remain safe around potentially hazardous meth equipment, Ayers suggested not touching the items if the individual is not sure of their contents. Empty soda bottles that contain a powder-like substance or appear disfigured or marred in an unusual way could have been used for drugs. Suspicious materials like the blemished bottles inside a trash bag could be cause for concern as well. If the damaged bottle is emitting strange smells or is accompanied by tubing, it was likely used for the manufacture of meth.

"Unfortunately, we don't live in the quiet community. Things are changing every day," Ayers said.

Anyone with information concerning the possible manufacture, sales or discarded equipment of methamphetamine is encouraged to call the Indiana State Police Versailles Post at 812-689-5000 or (800) 566-6704. Citizens can also call the statewide Methamphetamine Tip Line at (800) 453-4756. Callers may remain anonymous. Locally, anonymous calls to the Greensburg Police Department can be made to 66-CRIME (2-7463) and to the Decatur County SheriffÕs Department at 222-TIPS (8477).

Information supplied by the Indiana State Police and www.drugabuse.gov was used in this article.

1
Text Only
News
  • Cards RHP Kelly on DL WASHINGTON -- St. Louis Cardinals right-hander Joe Kelly has been put on the 15-day disabled list with a strained left hamstring. The Cardinals also optioned righty reliever Keith Butler to Triple-A Memphis and recalled rookie right-handers Eric Forn

    April 18, 2014

  • nws-gb041814-ymca flat rock - pic2 Local retreat mostly unknown around Decatur County ST. PAUL -- Out in the northwest corner of Decatur County lies a place that's largely unknown within the county itself. Oddly enough, this hideaway of natural splendor is anything but secret to the rest of the world. From Spain and Hong Kong they com

    April 18, 2014 2 Photos

  • nws-gb041814-edc job fair - pic2 Employers, jobseekers, meet at Job Fair GREENSBURG -- Twenty-eight prospective employers attended the annual Greensburg-Decatur County Economic Development Corporation (EDC) Job Fair Thursday, and plenty of Decatur Countians came out for a look at the work on offer. By 5:15 p.m., in fact,

    April 18, 2014 2 Photos

  • Low blood sugar? Grouchy spouses Serious discussions between spouses shouldn't take place on an empty stomach, a study suggests. Husbands and wives reported being most unhappy with their spouses when their blood-sugar levels were lowest, usually at night, according to research relea

    April 18, 2014

  • IUPUC student research to be showcased COLUMBUS -- The Office of Student Research will host its fourth annual student research exhibition from 2:30 to 4 p.m. Tuesday, April 22. The event will showcase findings from 11 funded projects completed at Indiana University-Purdue University Colum

    April 18, 2014

  • nws-gb041814-Intl night pic- page 1 Homemakers’ International Night features Indonesia GREENSBURG - Two clubs from the Indiana Extension Homemakers Association collaborated to host International Night recently, where the country of Indonesia was the focus of the evening. The Kitchen Kookies and the Twilighters are the two clubs respons

    April 18, 2014 1 Photo

  • SR 3 widening with traffic shift NORTH VERNON -- The Indiana Department of Transportation will shift traffic Monday as a second State Road 3 construction project gets underway at North Vernon. The state is widening S.R. 3 from JFK Drive to CR 300 North (at the bypass) to accommodat

    April 18, 2014

  • nws-gb041814-united fund pic- United Fund considers future community investments GREENSBURG - The Decatur County United Fund plays a significant role in mobilizing the community to develop and maintain resources to meet human needs by supporting programs and services addressing education, income and health in the community. Recen

    April 18, 2014 1 Photo

  • nws-gb041814-Airport fuel pic- page 1 Airport jet fuel tank gets replacement, upgrade GREENSBURG - The Greensburg Municipal Airport replaced its outdated jet fuel tank with a new, upgraded version Thursday afternoon. The Daily News spoke with Aviation Board Vice President Bill Ernstes to learn more about the new tank and why the airpo

    April 18, 2014 1 Photo

  • SB138 could level the playing field for victims GREENSBURG -- For New Directions Domestic Abuse Services Center Executive Director Diane Moore, the recent signing of Senate Bill 138 into law by Governor Mike Pence is something akin to a Godsend. According to the 2014 Indiana General Assembly websi

    April 18, 2014