Greensburg Daily News, Greensburg, IN

News

July 28, 2010

New Quick Cook Meth An Even More Dangerous Recipe

Greensburg — When the federal government passed the Combat Methamphetamine Epidemic Act in 2005, over-the-counter psuedoephedrine sales were restricted and the number of meth labs in the United States dropped sharply.

The act forced "meth cooks" and dealers to seek alternative methods of selling and manufacturing the highly addictive substance. As the Indiana State Police, the Greensburg Police Department and the Decatur County Sheriff's Department work to shut down meth distributorships in the county and surrounding communities, inventive and creative meth dealers have found another way to make the drug, threatening the progress that communities like Decatur County and law enforcement have made in the fight against it.

The new system of making meth is called the "one-pot method," sometimes referred to as the "shake and bake method."

According to Master Tpr. Chip Ayers of the ISP's Meth Suppression Section, the one-pot method takes less time, is just as strong and addictive as "normal" meth and is less traceable. Using the new strategy, meth makers mix smaller amounts of over-the-counter psuedoephedrine and other readily available chemicals in a plastic two-liter soda bottle.

The one-pot method allows meth makers to bypass the traditional meth lab and create the drug without a flame or a large-scale operation. It also reprieves Indiana's meth dealers from engaging in the risky behavior of anhydrous ammonia theft, a chief ingredient in the traditional meth recipe. Instead of pilfering the anhydrous ammonia, meth cooks can now mix together fertilizers and the psuedoephedrine in the two-liter bottle, or one pot. Farmers, sheriff's deputies and members of the community have become more alert around their anhydrous supplies, increasing the risk for those attempting to steal it. Innovative meth dealers have also found ways to extract ammonium nitrate, an ingredient necessary in the one-pot method, from "cold packs."

This new technique for making meth has been popularized in parts of Indiana, according to Tpr. Ayers. It has gained significant momentum in Jennings County and remains prevalent in areas north like South Bend and in the south-central part of the state.

"It's all they see up there," Ayers explained.

The one-pot method has not yet become the mode of choice in Decatur County for the meth trade, but its prevalence in surrounding communities could be cause for concern.

"In Decatur County, it's not very popular, yet," Ayers said. "Each and every week, we start to see more and more of it.Ó"

Though the traditional method and the one-pot system contain inherent risks due to the volatility of the chemicals involved, Ayers explained that the ISP is finding that the one-pot technique is actually more dangerous.

"The ingredients are just not compatible," he said.

The lithium batteries involved in both processes react violently in water, and in the one-pot method, they are directly compounded. This creates a potentially more volatile situation, in which the pot (the soda bottle) is held closely to the person and could erupt in a ball of fiery gas.

"Each and every way has its inherent dangers," Ayers said.

Once the meth is extracted from the pot, the cook will often dispose of the waste materials, usually by dumping them along the roadside, essentially putting the contents of the waste out in the open where they could potentially be found by children and pets. Ayers explained that when the equipment is thrown out, it is usually wrapped in an old bag or trash bag before being tossed outside. Recently, the Indiana State Police located two such items along the roadside in Sand Creek Township. Bridges and culverts are also hot spots for meth trash.

The discarded bottles are dangerous, due to the fact that the quick method of meth making does not allow the chemicals to be totally absorbed or utilized. To remain safe around potentially hazardous meth equipment, Ayers suggested not touching the items if the individual is not sure of their contents. Empty soda bottles that contain a powder-like substance or appear disfigured or marred in an unusual way could have been used for drugs. Suspicious materials like the blemished bottles inside a trash bag could be cause for concern as well. If the damaged bottle is emitting strange smells or is accompanied by tubing, it was likely used for the manufacture of meth.

"Unfortunately, we don't live in the quiet community. Things are changing every day," Ayers said.

Anyone with information concerning the possible manufacture, sales or discarded equipment of methamphetamine is encouraged to call the Indiana State Police Versailles Post at 812-689-5000 or (800) 566-6704. Citizens can also call the statewide Methamphetamine Tip Line at (800) 453-4756. Callers may remain anonymous. Locally, anonymous calls to the Greensburg Police Department can be made to 66-CRIME (2-7463) and to the Decatur County SheriffÕs Department at 222-TIPS (8477).

Information supplied by the Indiana State Police and www.drugabuse.gov was used in this article.

1
Text Only
News
  • nws-gb082314 Hayden Gambling pic 2 Gaming revenues rush over the border INDIANAPOLIS – Beer and barbecue aren’t the only draws to Daddy-O’s Bar & Grill in the small town of Paris, Ill., 15 miles from the Indiana border. The prospect of winning pulls in customers, as well.Since the neighborhood bar installed five video ga

    August 23, 2014 2 Photos

  • Dr. Brantly's Ebola recovery celebrated in medical community INDIANAPOLIS (WISH) – The release of Dr. Kent Brantly and his colleague Nancy Whitebol is being celebrated by the medical community around the world and right here in Central Indiana.Chad Priest said he was thrilled seeing Dr. Brantly released from E

    August 23, 2014

  • St. Mary's Festival promises busy weekend GREENSBURG – Kicking off Saturday morning with the “On Eagle’s Wings” 5K, this year’s St. Mary’s Festival promises a whole weekend of fun, with something sure to please every member of the family.Evening Mass will be held in the school gymnasium at 4

    August 23, 2014

  • nws-gb082314 child neglect mug Police: DCS advised child sleep in top bunk to escape beatings GREENSBURG — A Department of Child Services worker suggested to police that a 13-year-old boy, who routinely had been beaten by an adult, sleep in the top bunk of his bed in the hopes that the drunk adult would not be able to reach him, according to

    August 23, 2014 1 Photo

  • nws-gb082314-kaleb travels pic 1 North Decatur grad spends summer abroad GREENSBURG – Many people dream of traveling the world, visiting exotic locales far from home and walking the same grounds once trod by the titans of history.For North Decatur graduate Kaleb Kramer, that proverbial castle in the sky became reality thi

    August 23, 2014 3 Photos

  • Grants awarded to volunteer fire departments INDIANA – Rural and volunteer fire departments from 29 counties across Indiana have been awarded more than $194,000 in Volunteer Fire Assistance grants.The Burney-Clay Township Volunteer Fire Department was awarded a $5,000 grant to purchase safety e

    August 23, 2014

  • nws-gb082314-Police checkpoint pic Increased DUI enforcement planned Greensburg – The Decatur County Traffic Safety Partnership has a very direct message for motorists: Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over. Thursday, officers announced zero tolerance for anyone attempting to drive while impaired. Law enforcement agencies fr

    August 23, 2014 1 Photo

  • nws-gb082314 chinese student visit photo 2 Local teachers get surprise visitor -- from China GREENSBURG — High school teacher John Pratt raised both hands in front of his mouth in disbelief Thursday afternoon in his classroom when he received a surprise visit from someone he had met only weeks earlier — halfway across the globe.“No way,” he

    August 23, 2014 2 Photos

  • Decatur County Events Calendar Local clubs, service groups, fraternal organizations and others are encouraged to send their Coming Events information to the Daily News at news@greensburgdailynews.com or Daily News, PO Box 106, Greensburg, IN 47240.Aug. 239 a.m. – Tree City Saddle

    August 23, 2014

  • AT A GLANCE THANK YOU!The Daily News thanks the following subscribers for their continued readership:Bonnie Hodapp - GreensburgRobert Black - GreensburgINSIDE TODAYChurc h

    August 23, 2014