Greensburg Daily News, Greensburg, IN

May 6, 2013

Hospital Foundation concludes 2013 Capital Campaign

Rob Cox
Greensburg Daily News

Greensburg — In 2012, Decatur County Memorial Hospital (DCMH) washed 233,786 pounds of laundry, prepared 158,667 meals for both hospital clientele and various community organizations, performed 168,929 lab tests, and provided treatment for 16,242 Emergency Room visits.

Additionally, the hospital welcomed 271 new babies into the world last year and performed $2,160,348 in charity care.

As DCMH and the Hospital Foundation celebrated the culmination of the 2013 Capital Campaign Friday night, those numbers highlighted the ways DCMH and the Foundation will spend the $1,432,636 raised by the 2013 Campaign.

According to DCMH Director of Community Relations David Fry, the numbers also highlight the challenges facing the hospital in 2013.

“Our fundraising goal was $1.4 million,” Fry explained. “So we went over, and that’s always great, but we spent close to double $1.4 million on charity care alone last year.”

Those numbers don’t take into account DCMH’s current expansion project either, he added.

The Foundation and Hospital Boards, along with Greensburg-Decatur County community leaders and others, gathered at the home of prominent Decatur County farmer David Miers Friday night in celebration of both a successful 2013 Capital Campaign and the continued success of DCMH as an independent, community-run healthcare facility.

Fry told the audience that the 2013 Campaign informally kicked off with DCMH’s 90th Birthday Celebration Aug. 4.

The director went on to highlight the last nine months of fundraising, mentioning “a lot of groundbreaking and activity.”

He talked at length about the Hospital’s ongoing expansion project, which is currently in phase I. That phase is expected to be complete, with the accompanying facilities to open in September.

Every facet of the expansion, Fry explained — indeed, every facet of the Capital Campaign — is undertaken with the privacy, comfort or convenience of the patient in mind.

He thanked the gathering, most of whom have offered financial or other support for the just-concluded campaign, for ensuring “the future of not just the hospital, but also of the entire community by giving to this campaign.”

“When new businesses or others consider coming to town,” he said, “they always want to know, first of all, the quality of the schools, and then the quality of healthcare.”

Fry, who was recently promoted to Vice President of Operations of DCMH, will soon be leaving his current post. He called this, his last Capital campaign, and his impending departure “bittersweet.”

“I’ve been here eight years,” he told the Daily News after his presentation. “In that time, we’ve managed to take the Foundation from virtually nothing and build it into an important, substantial endeavor for the hospital and for this community. When I started, we had 80 contributor names in our database, and we took in 60 contributions in my first year. We now have 1,800 names and took in more than 1,000 donations in 2012.”

“With [healthcare] reimbursements continually shrinking,” he continued, “these kinds of donations are paramount. We’ve worked really hard to get the word out, to help people understand why having its own, locally run hospital is so beneficial for the community. We see consolidations and buyouts of smaller hospitals all the time by larger corporations, and you lose so much of that personal touch in those kinds of deals; you lose so many local services.”

Although he’s leaving the Foundation, Fry stressed that he looks forward to working with his successor to continue the momentum begun under his tenure.

“There are still lots of challenges ahead in healthcare,” he said. “And we understand we’ll continue to have to face those head-on moving forward. Our job is far from finished.”



Contact: Rob Cox at 812-663-3111 x7011