Greensburg Daily News, Greensburg, IN

April 2, 2013

Wednesday declared “Pirates” Day

City Council also tackles sign ordinance

Rob Cox
Greensburg Daily News

Greensburg — The Greensburg Boys Basketball team came dressed to impress Monday night as they gathered before an enthusiastic, elbow-to-elbow crowd at City Hall to be honored by Mayor Gary Herbert and the City Council.

Before passing the presentation honors to Councilman Darrell Poling, Herbert read the inscription from a commemorative plaque which formally declares April 3 “Pirate Day” in Greensburg.

“We had you here last year for a perfect season,” Poling said, accepting the plaque from Herbert and presenting it to Pirate Coach Stacy Meyer. “This year, you won the State Championship; that’s even better.”

Afterward, as players and coaches stood in a semi-circle, Herbert and the councilmen moved down their line shaking each hand.

Also on Monday night, the council again tackled the city’s long-in-the-works revised sign ordinance, completing a unanimous second read-through of the proposed ordinance with little substantive change. A third read through is slated for the council’s May meeting. If that read-through is approved, the measure will be formally adopted.

City Engineer Gary Murray told the Daily News on Tuesday that there are still “some opportunities for things to change between now and the third reading.”

Murray expressed reservations with some of the proposed ordinance’s changes to sign sizes, which are nearly double “in some instances,” compared to the current ordinance.

Should the proposed ordinance be approved as written, Murray said, it could prove problematic if, a few years down the road, the city decides the size maximums are indeed too large. By that point, even if the ordinance was changed to reduce size, existing signs falling under the old guidelines would likely be grandfathered; the city would thus be stuck with the old signs.

“It’s about the image you want for your community,” Murray said. “If you look at the Las Vegas strip, for instance, or Dollywood, there’s an overabundance of signage in such places, and it’s just not attractive. Big signs might be great for a business, but they’re not necessarily a great aesthetic for the city.”

Councilman Glen Tebbe, who played a significant role in helping draft the current proposal, said the proposed ordinance was carefully crafted and considered by the city’s Plan Commission. Tebbe is satisfied the proposal is ready for review by the council to “make sure it’s acceptable.”

He conceded that there’s room for change to the ordinance and that it’s “not perfect.”

He also acknowledged that the proposed ordinance’s maximum size allowances for building signage has given rise to much “discussion” among the council.

The maximum number of signs allowed within a pre-determined square footage for roadway signs has also caused significant discussion.

Regardless, Tebbe said the current proposal is “a good proposal. I think it’s in good shape and ready to be adopted and modified as needed.”

“I think what’s been has proposed has some sound arguments, with sound rationale behind it,” he added. “This is part science, part engineering, part aesthetics and part of it is common sense. I think the council will come to a good decision.”



Contact: Rob Cox at 812-663-3111 x7011.