INDIANAPOLIS – Area legislators have announced the latest recipients of the Hoosier Homestead Award, which recognizes farms that have been owned and maintained by the same family for 100 years or more.

The Hoosier Homestead Award Program honors families that have made significant contributions to Indiana agriculture. The program, instituted in 1976, recognizes the impact these family farms have made to the economic, cultural and social advancements of Indiana. In the past 40 years, more than 5,500 farms have received the honor.

Represented by State Sen. Chip Perfect (R-Lawrenceburg) and State Reps. Sean Eberhart (R-Shelbyville), Jim Lucas (R-Seymour) and Cindy Ziemke (R-Batesville), 10 locally owned farms were designated a Hoosier Homestead:

The Burney farm in Bartholomew County received a Centennial Award;

The Elsner farm in Jennings County received a Centennial Award;

The Guinn farm in Bartholomew County received a Sesquicentennial Award;

The Hopping farm in Dearborn County received Centennial, Sesquicentennial and Bicentennial Awards;

The Kirchhoff farm in Decatur County received a Centennial Award;

The Mahan farm in Rush County received a Centennial Award;

The Naylor farm in Ripley County received a Sesquicentennial Award;

The Obendorf farm in Ripley County received a Sesquicentennial Award;

The Otte/Webster farm in Ripley County received a Sesquicentennial Award; and

The Thayer farm in Bartholomew County received Centennial and Sesquicentennial Awards.

“Hoosier farmers generate more than $31.2 billion to our state’s economy, making Indiana the 10th largest agricultural state in the nation,” Perfect said. “The farms who are represented today make evident their work and accomplishments are multi-generational. I applaud our farms in Senate District 43 for reaching this historic milestone.”

“Families like these are the reason Indiana’s agriculture industry is one of the best in the nation,” Eberhart said. “These farms require resources like equipment and seeds that they often buy from their communities. They help to advance the farming industry with their success as well as Indiana’s economy.”

“Our state’s fertile soil makes for some of the best crops in the nation,” Lucas said. “Farmers have a unique set of skills to constantly produce a great harvest and raise healthy livestock, and these families have mastered their craft for generations.”

“As a small-business owner, I know the hard work and dedication it takes to make a successful operation,” Ziemke said. “These families have poured their blood, sweat and tears into their land for generations to keep their business flourishing.”

To be named a Hoosier Homestead, farms must be owned by the same family for at least 100 consecutive years and consist of more than 20 acres or produce more than $1,000 of agricultural products per year. The award distinctions are Centennial, Sesquicentennial and Bicentennial – for 100, 150 and 200 years respectively.

Two Hoosier Homestead award ceremonies are held each year – one at the Statehouse in March and one at the State Fair in August.

To learn more about the program or to apply for a Hoosier Homestead award, visit www.in.gov/isda/2337.htm.

– Information provided