GREENSBURG – The Greensburg Daily News somehow received word of the invasion of Normandy the same day the men landed there.

“Invasion Troops Are Filled With Faith in Mission” was one headline June 6, 1944. Sub title was: “No bravado, no tension, noticed by correspondent who watches departure of troops from England.”

Another headline, “4,000 Ships Aid Assault As Airborne Units Hit.” “Five U.S. Navy LSTs were sunk off Normandy during Overlord. Apart from delivering troops and equipment to the D-Day beaches, LSTs also were used as frontline hospital ships, evacuating casualties directly to England.” The subhead was, “Penetrations made alongside the coast between Le Havre and Cherbourg - Gen. Eisenhower in command.”

The next day, June 7, 1944, the headline in the Greensburg Daily News read: “Penetrate French Coast 12 Miles.” Sub head: “Reinforcements continue to land in great strength. Fighting heavy. Sky crowded with planes in support of Yank and British ground troops”

The Daily News carried a notice on the front page that there would be a prayer service from 1 to 2 p.m. Thursday (June 8, 1944). This was, “For a period of meditation and prayer for the speedy success of the Allied Division, Churches of Greensburg will be open from 1 to 2 p.m. Acting in accord with a request from Mayor C. J. Loyd and from L. H. Scripture, executive secretary of the Chamber of Commerce, business firms plan to close during the period. In several churches, a program of sacred organ music will be offered during this hour. Members of the various congregations can enter and leave the churches when they desire.”

The following men were engaged with the enemy on Normandy June 6, or the next day or two. If any man is not listed but was on Normandy, the Daily News hopes their names will be sent to the office.

Landis E. Ash, Entered service: US Army Oct. 1943. Engaged the enemy on Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, and Central France. He was awarded the European-African-Middle Eastern Theatre Ribbon with 4 Bronze Stars, Purple Heart, Bronze Star Medal. Discharged Dec. 19, 1945.

Dudley Amy, Entered service: US Army - Infantry, 79th Division June 10, 1942. Engagements: Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Central Europe. Awarded European-African-Middle Eastern Theatre Ribbon with 4 Bronze Stars, Bronze Medal. Discharged Sept. 27, 1945.

Van Batterton, US Navy, landed at Normandy June 7, 1944.

Paul Boicourt, Entered service July 10, 1942. Engagements: Normandy, Northern France, Battle of the Bulge and Germany. Awarded Purple Heart. Discharged Jan. 10, 1946.

James Ervel Chandler, Entered service Sept. 28, 1942. Overseas Feb. 27, 1944. Engagements: Normandy, Northern France. Awarded the Purple Heart. He was a prisoner of war in Germany. Discharged Jan. 30, 1946.

Raymond F. Carr, Entered service Dec. 23, 1942. Engagements: Normandy, Northern France, Ardennes, Rhineland and Central Europe Campaigns. Discharged Nov. 30, 1945.

Alfons J. Felis, Entered service Sept. 10, 1943. Engagements: Normandy , Northern France, Ardennes. Awarded European-African-Middle Eastern Theatre Ribbon with 3 Bronze Stars. Purple Heart, Bronze Star Medal, Discharged Nov. 16, 1945.

James K. Gaynor, Entered service January 17, 1941. Engagements: Normandy, Northern France, Central Europe, Ardennes, Rhineland. Awarded Bronze Star with 1 Oak Leaf Cluster, French Croix de Guerre, Czechoslovakian Military Cross. Discharged Jan. 22, 1946.

Alfred R. Henningsen, Entered service, Feb. 15, 1943. Engagements: Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes. Awarded Purple Heart with 2 clusters. Served 30 months. Discharged Oct. 18, 1945.

Orville L. Hersley, Entered service Nov. 23, 1943. Engagements: Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland. Awarded Purple Heart, European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Ribbon with 3 Battle Stars. Wounded in Germany Dec. 2, 1944. Discharged Jan. 21, 1946.

Russell Lowell Kelso, Entered Service Jan. 9, 1943. Engagements: Normandy Invasion. Discharged Nov. 14, 1944.

Jake H. Kindrick, Entered service Dec. 3, 1940. Engagements: Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, warded Purple Heart. Discharged June 22, 1945.

James Louis Hood, Entered service U.S. Navy May 18, 1941. Engagements: Normandy Invasion. Returned to United States July 28, 1944.

Rollin E. Lacey, Entered service US Army, Signal Corps, 294th Assault Company. Engagements: Invasion of Normandy, Northern France, served in the European and Pacific theatres. Awarded European Theatre Ribbon with 2 two Stars and Arrowhead, Pacific Theatre Ribbon , Presidential Unit Citation. Discharged Nov. 15, 1945.

William G. McLaughlin, Entered service Oct. 6, 1943. With the US Army, 28th Infantry (”Bloody Bucket”) Division. Rank Captain. Engagements: Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Ardennes, Central Germany. Awarded the European Africa Middle Eastern Theatre Ribbon with 5 Battle Stars. One Bronze Star. (Bloody Bucket men battled across Normandy, paraded into Paris, and smashed into the Siegfried line Sept. 11; the first troops to enter Germany in strength. Dec. 16, the Bloody Bucket caught the full force of Von Rundstedt’s Ardennes offensive).

James R. McLaughlin, Entered US Army Air Force Aug. 9, 1942. Served in Normandy, Northern France, Ardennes, Rhineland, Central Europe. Awarded European-African-Middle Eastern Theatre with 5 Bronze Stars. Discharged Nov. 16, 1945.

Robert H. Powner, Entered the U.S. Naval Reserve Feb. 26, 1943. Engagements: Invasion of Normandy, June 6, 1944. He served on the LST 30 and LST 974 and The USS Baltimore, served 13 months in the European Theatre and seven months in the Asiatic-Pacific Theaters. Discharged Nov. 9, 1945.

Robert H. Roberts, Entered service Feb. 11, 1941. U.S. Infantry, a Co. 1, and Infantry, 5th Division - 3rd Army. Engagements: Normandy, Saar Valley, Battle of the Bulge, Rhine River and Eastern Germany. Awarded Bronze Star, Silver Star, Purple Heart. Discharged June 16, 1945.

John H. Schilmoeller, Entered service April 13, 1943. US Army 820th Military Police Company. Engagements: Normandy, Northern France, Ardennes, Rhineland, Central Europe. Discharged Dec. 8, 1945.

Leo B. Schwering, Entered service March 25, 1942. US Army, Glider Infantry. Served in Normandy Campaign. Awarded Purple Heart and “several ribbons.” Discharged July 14, 1945.

David Wynn Shirk, Entered service Oct. 24, 1942. Engagements: Normandy, Northern France, Ardennes, Rhineland, Central Europe. Discharged Dec. 29, 1945.

Forrest R. Stevenson, Entered service June 10, 1942. Engagements: Normandy, Northern France, Rhineland, Central Europe, Ardennes. Awarded European-African-Middle Eastern Theatre Ribbon with 5 Bronze Stars. Discharged Nov. 17, 1945.

Raymond Edward Taylor, Entered service May 17, 1943. Engagements: Followed up First Army in invasion of Normandy, Battle of St. Lo. Awarded one Battle Star, Rifle and Truck Drivers Medal. Served 16 months, 7 months overseas. Lost life in France Sept. 9, 1944. Body returned to South Park Cemetery for burial. Parents Mr. and Mrs. Henry Taylor. Five sisters and three brothers survive.

Norman G. Witkemper, Entered service Sept. 10, 1943. Engagements: Normandy, Northern France, Germany. Awarded Purple Heart. Discharged Jan. 6, 1946.

Decatur County resident Pat Smith may be contacted via this publication at news@greensburgdailynews.com.