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A notice from the Greensburg Water Works issued information last week, stating, “Our water system recently violated a drinking water standard.” The plant superintendent said Monday they have addressed the issue and the water is safe.

GREENSBURG – Following a public notice late last week in regards to a drinking water violation, Greensburg Water Plant Superintendent Rick Denney offered more information on the matter, and also said local water is safe.

Denney said they had levels of total Trihalomethanes and Haloacetic Acids in October 2018 that “threw them off for the rest of the year.”

Denney said anyone that treats surface water has the same problems.

“We’re using powder activated carbon, and as far as samples, we are now in compliance and we are safe,” Denney said.

When asked about the safety of drinking water for local residents, Denney said they would “have to have continuous consumption over years to have any effect.”

A notice from the Greensburg Water Works issued information last week stating, “Our water system recently violated a drinking water standard.”

They specified that “although this isn’t an emergency,” their customers have a right to know what happened, what to do, and what they are doing to correct the situation.

“We are required to monitor your drinking water for specific contaminants on a regular basis,” the notice read. “The results of regular monitoring are an indicator of whether or not our drinking water meets EPA’s (Environmental Protection Agency) standards.”

The notice said the results they received for total Trihalomethanes and Haloacetic Acids for the April 1 to June 30 monitoring period showed their systems currently exceed the standard(s) or maximum contaminant level(s).

As far as what local residents should do, Greensburg Water Works said, “You do not need to use an alternative (e.g., bottled) water supply. However, if you have specific health concerns, consult your doctor.”

The notice from the local water works said some people who drink Trihalomethanes in excess of the maximum contaminant levels over “many years” may experience problems with their liver, kidneys, or central nervous system, and may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

The notice also mentioned some people who drink water containing Haloacetic Acids in excess of the maximum contaminant levels “over many years” may have an increased risk of getting cancer.

For more information, residents can call 812-663-2641.

Contact: Joshua Heath, 812-663-3111 x217401; joshua.heath@greensburgdailynews.com.

Contact: Joshua Heath, 812-663-3111 x217401; joshua.heath@greensburgdailynews.com.

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